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Hasbro has announced Ms. Monopoly, a “feminist” version of the classic board game that gives female players extra money and bonuses.

According to its tagline, Ms. Monopoly is “the first game where women make more than men.” Instead of all players receiving $200 when they pass Go, any women playing will get an extra $40 on top of that. Women also start out with $1900 in the bank, while men only receiver $1500. Hasbro said in a press release that the game was created to “celebrate women trailblazers”:

Hitting shelves in mid-September, Ms. Monopoly gives new meaning to the franchise, as properties are replaced by groundbreaking inventions and innovations made possible by women throughout history and instead of building houses, you build business headquarters. From inventions like WiFi to chocolate chip cookies, solar heating and modern shapewear, Ms. Monopoly celebrates everything from scientific advancements to everyday accessories – all created by women.

While the intentions may have been noble, the result is a mess and has come under fire from people all across the political spectrum. Writing in The New Yorker, Mary Pilon argued that “tout[ing] its new title as empowering to women, while ignoring a woman’s role in creating the game, was, at best, hypocritical,” and at worst, “only reinforces the false, misogynistic, and all-too-common belief that Monopoly is, then and now, purely a man’s game”:

Women have complained of being drowned out, overlooked, and ignored for centuries… Ms. Monopoly underscores an effort by Madison Avenue to champion feminism as a branding gimmick rather than make tangible change… If Hasbro is serious about women’s empowerment, perhaps the company could start by admitting that a woman invented Monopoly in the first place.

Conservative commentators were also not appreciative of the game:

This is not the first time that Hasbro has courted controversy with their Monopoly editions. Last month, they released “Monopoly: Socialism,” with its tagline of “winning is for capitalists!”

In 2018, they released the tongue-in-cheek “Monopoly for Millennials,” which made fun of stereotypical millennial behaviours, like avocado toast and veganism.

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